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  How the human brain exchanges information across sensory modalities to recognize other people

Blank, H., Kiebel, S. J., & von Kriegstein, K. (2015). How the human brain exchanges information across sensory modalities to recognize other people. Human Brain Mapping, 36(1), 324-339. doi:10.1002/hbm.22631.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0023-C974-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7C15-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Blank, Helen1, 2, Author              
Kiebel, Stefan J.3, 4, 5, Author              
von Kriegstein, Katharina1, 6, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
2MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Neurology, Biomagnetic Center, Jena University Hospital, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
5Department of Psychology, TU Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Cross-modal priming; Face recognition; Person identity; Voice recognition; Multisensory
 Abstract: Recognizing the identity of other individuals across different sensory modalities is critical for successful social interaction. In the human brain, face- and voice-sensitive areas are separate, but structurally connected. What kind of information is exchanged between these specialized areas during cross-modal recognition of other individuals is currently unclear. For faces, specific areas are sensitive to identity and to physical properties. It is an open question whether voices activate representations of face identity or physical facial properties in these areas. To address this question, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in humans and a voice-face priming design. In this design, familiar voices were followed by morphed faces that matched or mismatched with respect to identity or physical properties. The results showed that responses in face-sensitive regions were modulated when face identity or physical properties did not match to the preceding voice. The strength of this mismatch signal depended on the level of certainty the participant had about the voice identity. This suggests that both identity and physical property information was provided by the voice to face areas. The activity and connectivity profiles differed between face-sensitive areas: (i) the occipital face area seemed to receive information about both physical properties and identity, (ii) the fusiform face area seemed to receive identity, and (iii) the anterior temporal lobe seemed to receive predominantly identity information from the voice. We interpret these results within a prediction coding scheme in which both identity and physical property information is used across sensory modalities to recognize individuals.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-08-292014-07-072014-08-292014-09-122015-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/hbm.22631
PMID: 25220190
Other: Epub 2014
 Degree: -

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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 36 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 324 - 339 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925601686