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  Musically cued gait-training improves both perceptual and motor timing in Parkinson’s disease

Benoit, C.-E., Dalla Bella, S., Farrugia, N., Obrig, H., Mainka, S., & Kotz, S. A. (2014). Musically cued gait-training improves both perceptual and motor timing in Parkinson’s disease. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8: 494. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2014.00494.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0023-CEA8-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-8183-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Benoit, Charles-Etienne1, 2, 3, Author              
Dalla Bella, Simone1, 3, 4, Author
Farrugia, Nicolas2, 5, Author              
Obrig, Hellmuth6, 7, Author              
Mainka, Stefan8, Author
Kotz, Sonja A.2, 9, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Cognitive Psychology, University of Finance and Management, Warsaw, Poland, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
3Movement to Health Laboratory M2H - EuroMov, Université Montpellier, France, ou_persistent22              
4Institut Universitaire de France, Paris, France, ou_persistent22              
5Goldsmiths, University of London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
6Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
7Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
8Neurologisches Fachkrankenhaus für Bewegungsstörungen / Parkinson, Beelitz, Germany, ou_persistent22              
9School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Parkinson disease; Auditory cueing; Timing; Motor behavior; Perception
 Abstract: It is well established that auditory cueing improves gait in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). Disease-related reductions in speed and step length can be improved by providing rhythmical auditory cues via a metronome or music. However, effects on cognitive aspects of motor control have yet to be thoroughly investigated. If synchronization of movement to an auditory cue relies on a supramodal timing system involved in perceptual, motor, and sensorimotor integration, auditory cueing can be expected to affect both motor and perceptual timing. Here, we tested this hypothesis by assessing perceptual and motor timing in 15 IPD patients before and after a 4-week music training program with rhythmic auditory cueing. Long-term effects were assessed 1 month after the end of the training. Perceptual and motor timing was evaluated with a battery for the assessment of auditory sensorimotor and timing abilities and compared to that of age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy controls. Prior to training, IPD patients exhibited impaired perceptual and motor timing. Training improved patients’ performance in tasks requiring synchronization with isochronous sequences, and enhanced their ability to adapt to durational changes in a sequence in hand tapping tasks. Benefits of cueing extended to time perception (duration discrimination and detection of misaligned beats in musical excerpts). The current results demonstrate that auditory cueing leads to benefits beyond gait and support the idea that coupling gait to rhythmic auditory cues in IPD patients relies on a neuronal network engaged in both perceptual and motor timing.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-02-282014-06-182014-07-07
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00494
PMID: 25071522
PMC: PMC4083221
Other: eCollection 2014
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 Sequence Number: 494 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5161