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  My partner is also on my mind: Social context modulates the N1 response

Baess, P., & Prinz, W. (2015). My partner is also on my mind: Social context modulates the N1 response. Experimental Brain Research, 233(1), 105-113. doi:10.1007/s00221-014-4092-9.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0023-CF5E-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7C14-C
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Baess, Pamela1, 2, Author              
Prinz, Wolfgang1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
2Institute of Psychology, University of Hildesheim, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Joint action; Go/NoGo task; Co-representation; Self/other; N1 ; N2
 Abstract: When individuals share a task with a partner, one’s own actions and one’s partner’s actions have to be precisely tuned to one another. With behavioral means, it has been numerously shown that splitting a simple reaction time task between two participants produces similar interference patterns to those occurring when controlling the whole task on one’s own. Less is known about the neuronal correlates when sharing a task with a partner. The processes of agent identification (“my turn” vs. “my partner’s turn”) were the focus of this study. In an EEG study, pairs of participants responded to different action-associated stimuli in a Go/NoGo paradigm. The same task was performed together with a partner (joint Go/NoGo condition) and when a partner was not present (single Go/NoGo condition). This study showed a top-down influence of social setting on early visual processing as indexed by the Go-N1 and NoGo-N1 response. This effect was only present in the joint Go/NoGo condition. It was particularly present in those trials where the partner did not have to act. Taken together, these results yield evidence for an early top-down influence of social setting on early processes of stimulus identification and differentiation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-07-142014-08-302014-09-172015-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00221-014-4092-9
PMID: 25224703
Other: Epub 2014
 Degree: -

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Title: Experimental Brain Research
  Other : Exp. Brain Res.
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: 9 Volume / Issue: 233 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 105 - 113 Identifier: ISSN: 0014-4819
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925398496