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  The ecology and evolution of non-domesticated Saccharomyces species

Boynton, P. J., & Greig, D. (2014). The ecology and evolution of non-domesticated Saccharomyces species. Yeast, 31(12), 449-462. doi:10.1002/YEA.3040.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0023-DAD4-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-B60E-2
Genre: Journal Article

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Boynton_2014.pdf (Publisher version), 365KB
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 Creators:
Boynton, Primrose J.1, Author              
Greig, Duncan1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max-Planck Research Group Experimental Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445640              

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Free keywords: Saccharomyces paradoxus; Saccharomyces eubayanus; Saccharomyces uvarum; Saccharomyces kudriavzevii; Saccharomyces arboricola; Saccharomyces mikatae;
 Abstract: Yeast researchers need model systems for ecology and evolution, but the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is not ideal because its evolution has been affected by domestication. Instead, ecologists and evolutionary biologists are focusing on close relatives of S. cerevisiae: the seven species in the genus Saccharomyces. The best-studied Saccharomyces yeast, after S. cerevisiae, is S. paradoxus, an oak tree resident throughout the northern hemisphere. In addition, several more members of the Saccharomyces genus have recently been discovered. Some Saccharomyces species are only found in nature, while others include both wild and domesticated strains. Comparisons between domesticated and wild yeasts have pinpointed hybridization, introgression, and high phenotypic diversity as signatures of domestication. But studies of wild Saccharomyces natural history, biogeography, and ecology are only beginning. Much remains to understand about wild yeasts' ecological interactions and life cycles in nature. We encourage researchers to continue to investigate Saccharomyces yeasts in nature, both to place S. cerevisiae biology into its ecological context, and to develop the Saccharomyces genus as a model clade for ecology and evolution.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-07-212014-09-152014-10-232014-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/YEA.3040
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Title: Yeast
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY : John Wiley & Sons
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 31 (12) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 449 - 462 Identifier: ISSN: 0749-503X (print)
ISSN: 1097-0061 (online)
CoNE: /journals/resource/110990112651288_1