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  Mind your thoughts: Associations between self-generated thoughts and stress-induced and baseline levels of cortisol and alpha-amylase

Engert, V., Smallwood, J., & Singer, T. (2014). Mind your thoughts: Associations between self-generated thoughts and stress-induced and baseline levels of cortisol and alpha-amylase. Biological Psychology, 103, 283-291. doi:10.1016/j.biopsycho.2014.10.004.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0023-E87D-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7F7C-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Engert, Veronika1, Author              
Smallwood, Jonathan1, Author              
Singer, Tania1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              

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Free keywords: Self-generated thoughts; Mind wandering; Stress; Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis; Cortisol; Alpha-amylase
 Abstract: Stress is a major health burden in today's society. Research shows that negative cognitive styles are associated with increased stress reactivity, low mood and accelerated cellular aging. Our study sought to unravel the relationship between the content of self-generated thoughts and psychosocial stress measured in terms of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic activity. Features of self-generated thoughts were assessed using thought sampling while participants performed cognitive tasks following a stress induction or in a baseline condition. More negatively toned emotional thoughts and more social temporal thoughts with a past focus were associated with increased cortisol and alpha-amylase levels, both after stress and at baseline. More social temporal thoughts with a future focus, on the other hand, had an overall attenuating effect on the levels of both stress markers. Our results indicate a fundamental link between the thoughts and stress levels we experience. Understanding the mechanisms governing this mind-body association may have important implications for understanding and counteracting the high incidence of stress-related disorders in today's society.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-10-072014-10-062014-10-222014-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2014.10.004
PMID: 25457636
Other: Epub 2014
 Degree: -

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Title: Biological Psychology
  Other : Biol. Psychol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 103 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 283 - 291 Identifier: ISSN: 0301-0511
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925509377