English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Human preferences are biased towards associative information

Trapp, S., Shenhav, A., Bitzer, S., & Bar, M. (2015). Human preferences are biased towards associative information. Cognition & Emotion, 29(6), 1054-1068. doi:10.1080/02699931.2014.966064.

Item is

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Trapp, Sabrina1, Author              
Shenhav, Amitai2, Author
Bitzer, Sebastian1, Author              
Bar, Moshe3, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, NJ, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Gonda Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Prediction; Preference; Perception; Affect; Statistical learning; Novelty
 Abstract: There is ample evidence that the brain generates predictions that help interpret sensory input. To build such predictions the brain capitalizes upon learned statistical regularities and associations (e.g., “A” is followed by “B”; “C” appears together with “D”). The centrality of predictions to mental activities gave rise to the hypothesis that associative information with predictive value is perceived as intrinsically valuable. Such value would ensure that this information is proactively searched for, thereby promoting certainty and stability in our environment. We therefore tested here whether, all else being equal, participants would prefer stimuli that contained more rather than less associative information. In Experiments 1 and 2 we used novel, meaningless visual shapes and showed that participants preferred associative shapes over shapes that had not been associated with other shapes during training. In Experiment 3 we used pictures of real-world objects and again demonstrated a preference for stimuli that elicit stronger associations. These results support our proposal that predictive information is affectively tagged, and enhance our understanding of the formation of everyday preferences.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-04-282014-09-122014-10-102015-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/02699931.2014.966064
PMID: 25303050
Other: Epub 2014
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Cognition & Emotion
  Other : Cogn. Emot.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Taylor & Francis
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 29 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1054 - 1068 Identifier: ISSN: 0269-9931
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925255151