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  The genetics of a putative social trait in natural populations of yeast

Bozdag, G. O., & Greig, D. (2014). The genetics of a putative social trait in natural populations of yeast. Molecular Ecology, 23(20), 5061-5071. doi:10.1111/mec.12904.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0023-F526-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-4037-A
Genre: Journal Article

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Bozdag_Greig_2014.pdf (Publisher version), 235KB
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Bozdag, G. O.1, Author              
Greig, D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max-Planck Research Group Experimental Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445640              

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Free keywords: cheating; cooperation; copy number variation; droplet digital PCR; Saccharomyces; SUC
 Abstract: The sharing of secreted invertase by yeast cells is a well-established laboratory model for cooperation, but the only evidence that such cooperation occurs in nature is that the SUC loci, which encode invertase, vary in number and functionality. Genotypes that do not produce invertase can act as ‘cheats’ in laboratory experiments, growing on the glucose that is released when invertase producers, or ‘cooperators’, digest sucrose. However, genetic variation for invertase production might instead be explained by adaptation of different populations to different local availabilities of sucrose, the substrate for invertase. Here we find that 110 wild yeast strains isolated from natural habitats, and all contained a single SUC locus and produced invertase; none were ‘cheats’. The only genetic variants we found were three strains isolated instead from sucrose-rich nectar, which produced higher levels of invertase from three additional SUC loci at their subtelomeres. We argue that the pattern of SUC gene variation is better explained by local adaptation than by social conflict.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-08-212014-01-212014-08-252014-10-04
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/mec.12904
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Title: Molecular Ecology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Blackwell Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 23 (20) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 5061 - 5071 Identifier: ISSN: 0962-1083 (print)
ISSN: 1365-294X (online)
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925580119