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  Invisible visual stimuli elicit increases in alpha-band power

Bareither, I., Chaumon, M., Bernasconi, F., Villringer, A., & Busch, N. A. (2014). Invisible visual stimuli elicit increases in alpha-band power. Journal of Neurophysiology, 112(5), 1082-1090. doi:10.1152/jn.00550.2013.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-432A-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7F68-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Bareither, Isabelle1, 2, Author
Chaumon, Maximilien3, Author
Bernasconi, Fosco4, Author
Villringer, Arno1, 2, Author              
Busch, Niko A.3, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2The MindBrain Institute, Humboldt- Universität zu Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Institute of Medical Psychology, Charité University Medicine, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Alpha-band; EEG; Event-related synchronization; Oscillations; Subthreshold stimulation
 Abstract: The cerebral cortex responds to stimuli of a wide range of intensities. Previous studies have demonstrated that undetectably weak somatosensory stimuli cause a functional deactivation or inhibition in somatosensory cortex. In the present study, we tested whether invisible visual stimuli lead to similar responses, indicated by an increase in EEG alpha-band power—an index of cortical excitability. We presented subliminal and supraliminal visual stimuli after estimating each participant's detection threshold. Stimuli consisted of peripherally presented small circular patches that differed in their contrast to a background consisting of a random white noise pattern. We demonstrate that subliminal and supraliminal stimuli each elicit specific neuronal response patterns. Supraliminal stimuli evoked an early, strongly phase-locked lower-frequency response representing the evoked potential and induced a decrease in alpha-band power from 400 ms on. By contrast, subliminal visual stimuli induced an increase of non-phase-locked power around 300 ms that was maximal within the alpha-band. This response might be due to an inhibitory mechanism, which reduces spurious visual activation that is unlikely to result from external stimuli.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-08-012014-05-232014-09-012014-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1152/jn.00550.2013
PMID: 24872526
Other: Epub 2014
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Neurophysiology
  Other : J. Neurophysiol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Bethesda, MD : The Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 112 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1082 - 1090 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-3077
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925416959