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  Microbes are not bound by sociobiology: Response to Kümmerli and Ross-Gillespie (2013)

Rainey, P. B., Desprat, N., Driscoll, W. W., & Zhang, X.-X. (2014). Microbes are not bound by sociobiology: Response to Kümmerli and Ross-Gillespie (2013). Evolution, 68(11), 3344-3355. doi:10.1111/evo.12508.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-49E7-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-49E8-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Rainey, Paul B.1, Author              
Desprat, Nicolas, Author
Driscoll, William W., Author
Zhang, Xue-Xian, Author
Affiliations:
1External Scientific Member Group Experimental and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445637              

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Free keywords: alternate hypothesis; falsifiable data; public good; siderophore; social evolution
 Abstract: In recent years, sociobiology has been extended to microorganisms. Viewed through this lens, the microbial world is replete with cooperative behaviors. However, little attention has been paid to alternate hypotheses, making many studies self-confirming. Somewhat apart is a recent analysis of pyoverdin production—a paradigmatic public good and social trait—by Pseudomonas, which has revealed discord between predictions arising from sociobiology and the biology of microbes. This led the authors, Zhang and Rainey (Z&R), to question the generality of the conclusion that pyoverdin is a social trait, and to question the fit between the sociobiology framework and microbiology. This has unsettled Ku¨mmerli and Ross-Gillespie (K&R), who in a recent “Technical Comment” assert that arguments presented by Z&R are flawed, their experiments technically mistaken, and their understanding of social evolution theory naive. We demonstrate these claims to be without substance and show the conclusions of K&R to be based on a lack of understanding of redox chemistry and on misinterpretation of data. We also point to evidence of cherry-picking and raise the possibility of confirmation bias. Finally, we emphasize that the sociobiology framework applied to microbes is a hypothesis that requires rigorous and careful appraisal.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-05-122014-08-022014-09-292014-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/evo.12508
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Title: Evolution
  Other : Evolution
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Boulder, Colo.? : Society for the Study of Evolution
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 68 (11) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 3344 - 3355 Identifier: ISSN: 0014-3820 (print)
ISSN: 1558-5646 (online)
CoNE: /journals/resource/991042730870254