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  Neurofeedback of slow cortical potentials: Neural mechanisms and feasibility of a placebo-controlled design in healthy adults.

Gevensleben, H., Albrecht, B., Lütcke, H., Auer, T., Dewiputri, W. I., Schweizer, R., et al. (2014). Neurofeedback of slow cortical potentials: Neural mechanisms and feasibility of a placebo-controlled design in healthy adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8: 990. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2014.00990.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-687B-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-CC7D-0
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Gevensleben, H., Author
Albrecht, B., Author
Lütcke, H.1, Author              
Auer, T.1, Author              
Dewiputri, W. I.1, Author              
Schweizer, R.1, Author              
Moll, G., Author
Heinrich, H., Author
Rothenberger, A., Author
Affiliations:
1Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578634              

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Free keywords: neurofeedback; EEG-biofeedback; SCP training; fMRI; CNV; anterior cingulate cortex
 Abstract: To elucidate basic mechanisms underlying neurofeedback we investigated neural mechanisms of training of slow cortical potentials (SCPs) by considering EEG-and fMRI. Additionally, we analyzed the feasibility of a double-blind, placebo-controlled design in NF research based on regulation performance during treatment sessions and self assessment of the participants. Twenty healthy adults participated in 16 sessions of SCPs training: 9 participants received regular SCP training, 11 participants received sham feedback. At three time points (pre, intermediate, post) fMRI and EEG/ERP-measurements were conducted during a continuous performance test (CPT). Performance-data during the sessions (regulation performance) in the treatment group and the placebo group were analyzed. Analysis of EEG-activity revealed in the SCP group a strong enhancement of the CNV (electrode Cz) at the intermediate assessment, followed by a decrease back to baseline at the post-treatment assessment. In contrast, in the placebo group a continuous but smaller increase of the CNV could be obtained from pre to post assessment. The increase of the CNV in the SCP group at intermediate testing was superior to the enhancement in the placebo group. The changes of the CNV were accompanied by a continuous improvement in the test performance of the CPT from pre to intermediate to post assessment comparable in both groups. The change of the CNV in the SCP group is interpreted as an indicator of neural plasticity and efficiency while an increase of the CNV in the placebo group might reflect learning and improved timing due to the frequent task repetition. In the fMRI analysis evidence was obtained for neuronal plasticity. After regular SCP neurofeedback activation in the posterior parietal cortex decreased from the pre-to the intermediate measurement and increased again in the post measurement, inversely following the U-shaped increase and decrease of the tCNV EEG amplitude in the SCP-trained group. Furthermore, we found a localized increase of activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Analyses of the estimation of treatment assignment by the participants indicate feasibility of blinding. Participants could not assess treatment assignment confidently. Participants of the SCP-group improved regulation capability during treatment sessions (in contrast to the participants of the placebo-group), although regulation capability appeared to be instable, presumably due to diminished confidence in the training (SCP- or sham-training). Our results indicate that SCP training in healthy adults might lead to functional changes in neuronal circuits serving cognitive preparation even after a limited number of sessions.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-12-11
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00990
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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: 13 Volume / Issue: 8 Sequence Number: 990 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -