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  Generalization of word meanings during infant sleep

Friedrich, M., Wilhelm, I., Born, J., & Friederici, A. D. (2015). Generalization of word meanings during infant sleep. Nature Communications, 6: 6004. doi:10.1038/ncomms7004.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-AC87-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-78D1-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Friedrich, Manuela1, 2, Author              
Wilhelm, Ines3, 4, 5, Author
Born, Jan4, 5, Author
Friederici, Angela D.2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
3Child Development Center (CDC), University Children’s Hospital, Zürich, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
4Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Neurobiology, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Center for Integrative Neuroscience, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Biological sciences, Neuroscience
 Abstract: Sleep consolidates memory and promotes generalization in adults, but it is still unknown to what extent the rapidly growing infant memory benefits from sleep. Here we show that during sleep the infant brain reorganizes recent memories and creates semantic knowledge from individual episodic experiences. Infants aged between 9 and 16 months were given the opportunity to encode both objects as specific word meanings and categories as general word meanings. Event-related potentials indicate that, initially, infants acquire only the specific but not the general word meanings. About 1.5 h later, infants who napped during the retention period, but not infants who stayed awake, remember the specific word meanings and, moreover, successfully generalize words to novel category exemplars. Independently of age, the semantic generalization effect is correlated with sleep spindle activity during the nap, suggesting that sleep spindles are involved in infant sleep-dependent brain plasticity.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-04-222014-12-012015-01-29
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/ncomms7004
PMID: 25633407
PMC: PMC4316748
 Degree: -

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Title: Nature Communications
  Abbreviation : Nat. Commun.
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 Sequence Number: 6004 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2041-1723
CoNE: /journals/resource/2041-1723