English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Origins of multicellular evolvability in snowflake yeast

Ratcliff, W. C., Fankhauser, J. D., Rogers, D. W., Greig, D., & Travisano, M. (2015). Origins of multicellular evolvability in snowflake yeast. Nature Communications, 6: 6102. doi:10.1038/ncomms7102.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-CB10-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-E3F6-D
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Ratcliff_et_al_2015.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
Name:
Ratcliff_et_al_2015.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Ratcliff, William C., Author
Fankhauser, Johnathon D., Author
Rogers, David W.1, Author              
Greig, Duncan1, Author              
Travisano, Michael, Author
Affiliations:
1Max-Planck Research Group Experimental Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445640              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Biological sciences; Evolution; Genetics
 Abstract: Complex life has arisen through a series of ‘major transitions’ in which collectives of formerly autonomous individuals evolve into a single, integrated organism. A key step in this process is the origin of higher-level evolvability, but little is known about how higher-level entities originate and gain the capacity to evolve as an individual. Here we report a single mutation that not only creates a new level of biological organization, but also potentiates higher-level evolvability. Disrupting the transcription factor ACE2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae prevents mother–daughter cell separation, generating multicellular ‘snowflake’ yeast. Snowflake yeast develop through deterministic rules that produce geometrically defined clusters that preclude genetic conflict and display a high broad-sense heritability for multicellular traits; as a result they are preadapted to multicellular adaptation. This work demonstrates that simple microevolutionary changes can have profound macroevolutionary consequences, and suggests that the formation of clonally developing clusters may often be the first step to multicellularity.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-05-132014-12-152015-01-20
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/ncomms7102
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Nature Communications
  Abbreviation : Nat. Commun.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: 9 S. Volume / Issue: 6 Sequence Number: 6102 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2041-1723 (online)
CoNE: /journals/resource/2041-1723