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  In favor of general probability distributions: Lateral prefrontal and insular cortices respond to stimulus inherent, but irrelevant differences

Mestres-Misse, A., Trampel, R., Turner, R., & Kotz, S. A. (2016). In favor of general probability distributions: Lateral prefrontal and insular cortices respond to stimulus inherent, but irrelevant differences. Brain Structure & Function, 221(3), 1781-1786. doi:10.1007/s00429-014-0966-7.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0024-E54E-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1A63-1
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Mestres-Misse, Anna1, 2, Author              
Trampel, Robert3, Author              
Turner, Robert4, Author              
Kotz, Sonja A.1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634551              
3Department Neurophysics (Weiskopf), MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_2205649              
4Department Neurophysics, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634550              

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Free keywords: Ambiguity; Uncertainty; Probability distributions; Prefrontal cortex; Anterior insula; fMRI
 Abstract: A key aspect of optimal behavior is the ability to predict what will come next. To achieve this, we must have a fairly good idea of the probability of occurrence of possible outcomes. This is based both on prior knowledge about a particular or similar situation and on immediately relevant new information. One question that arises is: when considering converging prior probability and external evidence, is the most probable outcome selected or does the brain represent degrees of uncertainty, even highly improbable ones? Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, the current study explored these possibilities by contrasting words that differ in their probability of occurrence, namely, unbalanced ambiguous words and unambiguous words. Unbalanced ambiguous words have a strong frequency-based bias towards one meaning, while unambiguous words have only one meaning. The current results reveal larger activation in lateral prefrontal and insular cortices in response to dominant ambiguous compared to unambiguous words even when prior and contextual information biases one interpretation only. These results suggest a probability distribution, whereby all outcomes and their associated probabilities of occurrence-even if very low-are represented and maintained.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-06-302014-12-102014-12-192016-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00429-014-0966-7
PMID: 25523107
Other: Epub 2014
 Degree: -

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Title: Brain Structure & Function
  Abbreviation : Brain Struct Funct
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Berlin : Springer
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 221 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1781 - 1786 Identifier: ISSN: 1863-2653
CoNE: /journals/resource/1863-2653