English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a nomadic yeast with no niche?

Goddard, M. R., & Greig, D. (2015). Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a nomadic yeast with no niche? FEMS Yeast Research, 15(3): fov009. doi:10.1093/femsyr/fov009.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0025-05ED-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-A8A0-2
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Goddard and Greig 2015.pdf (Preprint), 204KB
Name:
Goddard and Greig 2015.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-
:
Goddard_Greig_2015_publisher_version.pdf (Publisher version), 179KB
Name:
Goddard_Greig_2015_publisher_version.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Goddard, Matthew R., Author
Greig, Duncan1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max-Planck Research Group Experimental Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445640              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Crabtree effect; adaptation; fermentation; fruit; natural history; neutral ecology; niche
 Abstract: Different species are usually thought to have specific adaptations, which allow them to occupy different ecological niches. But recent neutral ecology theory suggests that species diversity can simply be the result of random sampling, due to finite population sizes and limited dispersal. Neutral models predict that species are not necessarily adapted to specific niches, but are functionally equivalent across a range of habitats. Here we evaluate the ecology of S. cerevisiae, one of the most important microbial species in human history. The artificial collection, concentration, and fermentation of large volumes of fruit for alcohol production produces an environment in which S. cerevisiae thrives, and therefore it is assumed that fruit is the ecological niche that S. cerevisiae inhabits and has adapted to. We find very little direct evidence that S. cerevisiae is adapted to fruit, or indeed to any other specific niche. We propose instead a neutral nomad model for S. cerevisiae, which we believe should be used as the starting hypothesis in attempting to unravel the ecology of this important microbe.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-01-202015-02-212015-02-272015-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/femsyr/fov009
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: FEMS Yeast Research
  Other : FEMS Yeast Res.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam : No longer published by Elsevier
Pages: 6 S. Volume / Issue: 15 (3) Sequence Number: fov009 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1567-1356 (print)
ISSN: 1567-1364 (online)
CoNE: /journals/resource/111000137403004