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  Does that look heavy to you?: Perceived weight judgement in lifting actions in younger and older adults

Maguinness, C., Setti, A., Roudaia, E., & Kenny, R. A. (2013). Does that look heavy to you?: Perceived weight judgement in lifting actions in younger and older adults. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 7: 795. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2013.00795.

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 Creators:
Maguinness, Corrina1, 2, Author              
Setti, Annalisa3, 4, Author
Roudaia, Eugenie2, Author
Kenny, Rose Anne2, 3, Author
Affiliations:
1School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, ou_persistent22              
2Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, ou_persistent22              
3The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, ou_persistent22              
4School of Applied Psychology, University College Cork, Ireland, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Action perception; Motion perception; Visuomotor; Sensorimotor; Embodied cognition; Motor simulation; Weight judgment; Aging
 Abstract: When interpreting other people's movements or actions, observers may not only rely on the visual cues available in the observed movement, but they may also be able to "put themselves in the other person's shoes" by engaging brain systems involved in both "mentalizing" and motor simulation. The ageing process brings changes in both perceptual and motor abilities, yet little is known about how these changes may affect the ability to accurately interpret other people's actions. Here we investigated the effect of ageing on the ability to discriminate the weight of objects based on the movements of actors lifting these objects. Stimuli consisted of videos of an actor lifting a small box weighing 0.05-0.9 kg or a large box weighting 3-18 kg. In a four-alternative forced-choice task, younger and older participants reported the perceived weight of the box in each video. Overall, older participants were less sensitive than younger participants in discriminating the perceived weight of lifted boxes, an effect that was especially pronounced in the small box condition. Weight discrimination performance was better for the large box compared to the small box in both groups, due to greater saliency of the visual cues in this condition. These results suggest that older adults may require more salient visual cues to interpret the actions of others accurately. We discuss the potential contribution of age-related changes in visual and motor function on the observed effects and suggest that older adults' decline in the sensitivity to subtle visual cues may lead to greater reliance on visual analysis of the observed scene and its semantic context.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-07-122013-10-312013-11-25
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2013.00795
PMID: 24324423
PMC: PMC3839046
Other: eCollection 2013
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 7 Sequence Number: 795 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5161