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  How may the basal ganglia contribute to auditory categorization and speech perception?

Lim, S.-J., Fiez, J. A., & Holt, L. L. (2014). How may the basal ganglia contribute to auditory categorization and speech perception? Frontiers in Neuroscience, 8: 230. doi:10.3389/fnins.2014.00230.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0025-6A39-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7C71-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Lim, Sung-Joo1, 2, 3, Author              
Fiez, Julie A.2, 4, 5, Author
Holt, Lori L.1, 2, 4, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Neuroscience, Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Max Planck Research Group Auditory Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_751545              
4Department of Neuroscience, Center for Neuroscience, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, ou_persistent22              
5Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Speech category learning; Perceptual learning; Basal ganglia; Speech perception; Categorization; Plasticity
 Abstract: Listeners must accomplish two complementary perceptual feats in extracting a message from speech. They must discriminate linguistically-relevant acoustic variability and generalize across irrelevant variability. Said another way, they must categorize speech. Since the mapping of acoustic variability is language-specific, these categories must be learned from experience. Thus, understanding how, in general, the auditory system acquires and represents categories can inform us about the toolbox of mechanisms available to speech perception. This perspective invites consideration of findings from cognitive neuroscience literatures outside of the speech domain as a means of constraining models of speech perception. Although neurobiological models of speech perception have mainly focused on cerebral cortex, research outside the speech domain is consistent with the possibility of significant subcortical contributions in category learning. Here, we review the functional role of one such structure, the basal ganglia. We examine research from animal electrophysiology, human neuroimaging, and behavior to consider characteristics of basal ganglia processing that may be advantageous for speech category learning. We also present emerging evidence for a direct role for basal ganglia in learning auditory categories in a complex, naturalistic task intended to model the incidental manner in which speech categories are acquired. To conclude, we highlight new research questions that arise in incorporating the broader neuroscience research literature in modeling speech perception, and suggest how understanding contributions of the basal ganglia can inform attempts to optimize training protocols for learning non-native speech categories in adulthood.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-04-232014-07-132014-08-01
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2014.00230
PMID: 25136291
PMC: PMC4117994
Other: eCollection 2014
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Title: Frontiers in Neuroscience
  Other : Front Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 Sequence Number: 230 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-4548
ISSN: 1662-453X
CoNE: /journals/resource/1662-4548