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  Visual face-movement sensitive cortex is relevant for auditory-only speech recognition

Riedel, P., Ragert, P., Schelinski, S., Kiebel, S. J., & von Kriegstein, K. (2015). Visual face-movement sensitive cortex is relevant for auditory-only speech recognition. Cortex, 68, 86-99. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2014.11.016.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0025-79CC-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7963-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Riedel, Philipp1, 2, 3, Author              
Ragert, Patrick4, Author              
Schelinski, Stefanie1, Author              
Kiebel, Stefan J.3, 4, Author              
von Kriegstein, Katharina1, 5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
2Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Neuroimaging Center, TU Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
5Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Auditory; Speech; Lip-reading; Prediction; pSTS; tDCS
 Abstract: It is commonly assumed that the recruitment of visual areas during audition is not relevant for performing auditory tasks (‘auditory-only view’). According to an alternative view, however, the recruitment of visual cortices is thought to optimize auditory-only task performance (‘auditory-visual view’). This alternative view is based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. These studies have shown, for example, that even if there is only auditory input available, face-movement sensitive areas within the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) are involved in understanding what is said (auditory-only speech recognition). This is particularly the case when speakers are known audio-visually, that is, after brief voice-face learning. Here we tested whether the left pSTS involvement is causally related to performance in auditory-only speech recognition when speakers are known by face. To test this hypothesis, we applied cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the pSTS during (i) visual-only speech recognition of a speaker known only visually to participants and (ii) auditory-only speech recognition of speakers they learned by voice and face. We defined the cathode as active electrode to down-regulate cortical excitability by hyperpolarization of neurons. tDCS to the pSTS interfered with visual-only speech recognition performance compared to a control group without pSTS stimulation (tDCS to BA6/44 or sham). Critically, compared to controls, pSTS stimulation additionally decreased auditory-only speech recognition performance selectively for voice-face learned speakers. These results are important in two ways. First, they provide direct evidence that the pSTS is causally involved in visual-only speech recognition; this confirms a long-standing prediction of current face-processing models. Secondly, they show that visual face-sensitive pSTS is causally involved in optimizing auditory-only speech recognition. These results are in line with the ‘auditory-visual view’ of auditory speech perception, which assumes that auditory speech recognition is optimized by using predictions from previously encoded speaker-specific audio-visual internal models.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-07-162014-11-252014-12-232015-07-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2014.11.016
PMID: 25650106
Other: Epub 2014
 Degree: -

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Title: Cortex
  Other : Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 68 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 86 - 99 Identifier: ISSN: 0010-9452
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925393344