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  The development of social brain functions in infancy

Grossmann, T. (2015). The development of social brain functions in infancy. Psychological Bulletin, 141(6), 1266-1287. doi:10.1037/bul0000002.

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 Creators:
Grossmann, Tobias1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Early Social Development, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356545              

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Free keywords: Development; Infancy; Social cognition; Social neuroscience
 Abstract: One fundamental question in psychology is what makes humans such intensely social beings. Probing the developmental and neural origins of our social capacities is a way of addressing this question. In the last 10 years the field of social–cognitive development has witnessed a surge in studies using neuroscience methods to elucidate the development of social information processing during infancy. While the use of electroencephalography (EEG)/event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) has revealed a great deal about the timing and localization of the cortical processes involved in early social cognition, the principles underpinning the early development of social brain functioning remain largely unexplored. Here I provide a framework that delineates the essential processes implicated in the early development of the social brain. In particular, I argue that the development of social brain functions in infancy is characterized by the following key principles: (a) self-relevance, (b) joint engagement, (c) predictability, (d) categorization, (e) discrimination, and (f) integration. For all of the proposed principles, I provide empirical examples to illustrate when in infancy they emerge. Moreover, I discuss to what extent they are in fact specifically social in nature or share properties with more domain-general developmental principles. Taken together, this article provides a conceptual integration of the existing EEG/ERPs and fNIRS work on infant social brain function and thereby offers the basis for a principle-based approach to studying the neural correlates of early social cognition.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-03-192015-05-182015-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1037/bul0000002
PMID: 25984728
Other: Epub 2015
 Degree: -

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Title: Psychological Bulletin
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Washington [etc.] : American Psychological Association (PsycARTICLES)
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 141 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1266 - 1287 Identifier: ISSN: 0033-2909
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954921357405