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  Effects of mating order and male size on embryo survival in a pipefish

Braga Goncalves, I., Mobley, K. B., Ahnesjo, I., Sagebakken, G., Jones, A. G., & Kvarnemo, C. (2015). Effects of mating order and male size on embryo survival in a pipefish. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 114(3), 639-645. doi:10.1111/bij.12441.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0026-A1DB-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0026-C2FB-8
Genre: Journal Article

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Braga Goncalves, Ines, Author
Mobley, Kenyon B.1, Author              
Ahnesjo, Ingrid, Author
Sagebakken, Gry, Author
Jones, Adam G., Author
Kvarnemo, Charlotta, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

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Free keywords: differential allocation; mating constraints; parental investment; paternal care; reproductive compensation hypothesis; sex role-reversal
 Abstract: In species that provide parental care, individuals should invest adaptively in their offspring in relation to the preand post-zygotic care provided by their partners. In the broad-nosed pipefish, Syngnathus typhle L., females transfer large, nutrient-rich eggs into the male brood pouch during mating. The male broods and nourishes the embryos for several weeks before independent juveniles emerge at parturition. Given a choice, females clearly prefer large partners. Yet, females provide protein-richer eggs when the same individual mates with a smaller than a larger male. In the present study, we allowed each female to mate with one small and one large male, in alternated order. We found a strong effect of female mating order, with larger clutches and higher embryo mortality in first- than second-laid broods, which may suggest that eggs over-ripen in the ovaries or reflect the negative effects of high embryo density in the brood pouch. In either case, this effect should put constraints on the possibility of a female being selective in mate choice. We also found that small and large males produced embryos of similar size and survival, consistent with the reproductive compensation hypothesis, suggesting that, in this species, larger males provide better nourishment to the embryos than smaller males.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-10-062014-08-022014-10-062014-12-302015-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/bij.12441
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Title: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Wiley
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 114 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 639 - 645 Identifier: ISSN: 0024-4066 (print)
ISSN: 1095-8312 (online)
CoNE: /journals/resource/954922646052