English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Reduction of thermocoagulative injury via use of a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) in laryngeal tissues

Böttcher, A., Kucher, S., Knecht, R., Jowett, N., Krötz, P., Reimer, R., et al. (2015). Reduction of thermocoagulative injury via use of a picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) in laryngeal tissues. European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, 272(4), 941-948. doi:10.1007/s00405-015-3501-4.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0026-B0E6-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002A-3E93-6
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Locator:
https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-015-3501-4 (Publisher version)
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Böttcher, Arne1, 2, Author
Kucher, Stanislav1, 3, Author
Knecht, Rainald1, Author
Jowett, Nathan1, 4, Author
Krötz, Peter5, 6, Author              
Reimer, Rudolph7, Author
Schumacher, Udo8, Author
Anders, Sven9, Author
Münscher, Adrian1, Author
Dalchow, Carsten V.1, Author
Miller, R. J. Dwayne5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Charite´-University Medical Center Berlin, Campus Virchow- Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA, ou_persistent22              
5Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society, ou_1938288              
6International Max Planck Research School for Ultrafast Imaging & Structural Dynamics (IMPRS-UFAST), Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society, ou_2266714              
7Leibniz Institute for Experimental Virology, Heinrich Pette Institute, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
8Department of Anatomy and Experimental Morphology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
9Department of Legal Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Laryngeal surgery; Er:YAG laser; CO2 laser; PIRL; Damage zones; Electron microscopy; Thermography
 Abstract: The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is routinely used in glottic microsurgery for the treatment of benign and malignant disease, despite significant collateral thermal damage secondary to photothermal vaporization without thermal confinement. Subsequent tissue response to thermal injury involves excess collagen deposition resulting in scarring and functional impairment. To minimize collateral thermal injury, short-pulse laser systems such as the microsecond pulsed erbium:yttrium–aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser and picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) have been developed. This study compares incisions made in ex vivo human laryngeal tissues by CO2 and Er:YAG lasers versus PIRL using light microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and infrared thermography (IRT). In comparison to the CO2 and Er:YAG lasers, PIRL incisions showed significantly decreased mean epithelial (59.70 µm) and subepithelial (22.15 µm) damage zones (p < 0.05). Cutting gaps were significantly narrower for PIRL (133.70 µm) compared to Er:YAG and CO2 lasers (p < 0.05), which were more than 5 times larger. ESEM revealed intact collagen fibers along PIRL cutting edges without obvious carbonization, in comparison to diffuse carbonization and tissue melting seen for CO2 and Er:YAG laser incisions. IRT demonstrated median temperature rise of 4.1 K in PIRL vocal fold incisions, significantly less than for Er:YAG laser cuts (171.85 K; p < 0.001). This study has shown increased cutting precision and reduced lateral thermal damage zones for PIRL ablation in comparison to conventional CO2 and Er:YAG lasers in human glottis and supraglottic tissues.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-12-112015-01-032015-01-112015-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 8
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00405-015-3501-4
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 272 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 941 - 948 Identifier: CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/0937-4477