English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The language skeleton after dissecting meaning: a functional segregation within Broca’s area

Goucha, T., & Friederici, A. D. (2015). The language skeleton after dissecting meaning: a functional segregation within Broca’s area. NeuroImage, 114(6), 294-302. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.04.011.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0026-BA46-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-14A4-D
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Goucha, Tomás1, 2, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Language processing; fMRI; Broca's area; Syntax; Morphology; Pseudowords
 Abstract: Broca's area is proposed as a crucial brain area for linguistic computations. Language processing goes beyond word-level processing, also implying the integration of meaningful information (semantics) with the underlying structural skeleton (syntax). There is an on-going debate about the specialisation of the subregions of Broca's area—Brodmann areas (BA) 44 and 45—regarding the latter aspects. Here, we tested if syntactic information is specifically processed in BA 44, whereas BA 45 is mainly recruited for semantic processing. We contrasted conditions with sentence structure against conditions with random order in two fMRI experiments. Besides, in order to disentangle these processes, we systematically removed the amount of semantic information available in the stimuli. This was achieved in Experiment 1 by replacing meaningful words (content words) by pseudowords. Within real word conditions we found broad activation in the left hemisphere, including the inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45/47), the anterior temporal lobe and posterior superior temporal gyrus (pSTG) and sulcus (pSTS). For pseudowords we found a similar activation pattern, still involving BA 45. Among the pseudowords in Experiment 1, we kept those word elements that convey meaning like un- in unhappy or -hood in brotherhood (i.e. derivational morphology). In Experiment 2 we tested whether the activation in BA 45 was due to their presence. We therefore further removed derivational morphology, only leaving word elements that determine syntactic structure (i.e. inflectional morphology, e.g. the verb ending -s in he paints). Now, in the absence of all semantic cues, including derivational morphology, only BA 44 was active. Additional analyses showed a selective responsiveness of this area to syntax-relevant cues. These findings confirm BA 44 as a core area for the processing of pure syntactic information. This furthermore suggests that the brain represents structural and meaningful aspects of language separately.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-11-072015-04-052015-04-112015-07-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.04.011
PMID: 25871627
Other: Epub 2015
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 114 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 294 - 302 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166