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  Sleep Spindles and Intelligence: Evidence for a Sexual Dimorphism

Ujma, P. P., Konrad, B. N., Genzel, L., Bleifuss, A., Simor, P., Potari, A., et al. (2014). Sleep Spindles and Intelligence: Evidence for a Sexual Dimorphism. JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE, 34(49), 16358-16368. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1857-14.2014.

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 Creators:
Ujma, Peter P.1, Author
Konrad, Boris Nikolai1, Author
Genzel, Lisa1, Author
Bleifuss, Annabell2, Author           
Simor, Peter1, Author
Potari, Adrian1, Author
Koermendi, Janos1, Author
Gombos, Ferenc1, Author
Steiger, Axel3, Author           
Bodizs, Robert1, Author
Dresler, Martin3, Author           
Affiliations:
1external, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society, ou_1607137              
3Dept. Clinical Research, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society, ou_2035296              

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 Abstract: Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in nonrapid eye movement sleep, which play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Sleep spindle features are stable within and vary between individuals, with, for example, females having a higher number of spindles and higher spindle density than males. Sleep spindles have been associated with learning potential and intelligence; however, the details of this relationship have not been fully clarified yet. In a sample of 160 adult human subjects with a broad IQ range, we investigated the relationship between sleep spindle parameters and intelligence. In females, we found a positive age-corrected association between intelligence and fast sleep spindle amplitude in central and frontal derivations and a positive association between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in all except one derivation. In males, a negative association between intelligence and fast spindle density in posterior regions was found. Effects were continuous over the entire IQ range. Our results demonstrate that, although there is an association between sleep spindle parameters and intellectual performance, these effects are more modest than previously reported and mainly present in females. This supports the view that intelligence does not rely on a single neural framework, and stronger neural connectivity manifesting in increased thalamocortical oscillations in sleep is one particular mechanism typical for females but not males.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-12-03
 Publication Status: Issued
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Title: JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington, DC, USA : Society for Neuroscience
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 34 (49) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 16358 - 16368 Identifier: ISSN: 0270-6474