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  My Virtual Dream: Collective neurofeedback in an immersive art environment

Kovacevic, N., Ritter, P., Tays, W., Moreno, S., & McIntosh, A. R. (2015). My Virtual Dream: Collective neurofeedback in an immersive art environment. PLoS One, 10(7): e0130129. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0130129.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-1141-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-789B-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kovacevic, Natasha1, Author
Ritter, Petra2, 3, Author              
Tays, William1, Author
Moreno, Sylvain1, 4, Author
McIntosh, Anthony Randal1, 4, Author
Affiliations:
1Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              
2Minerva Research Group Brain Modes, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_751546              
3Department of Neurology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: While human brains are specialized for complex and variable real world tasks, most neuroscience studies reduce environmental complexity, which limits the range of behaviours that can be explored. Motivated to overcome this limitation, we conducted a large-scale experiment with electroencephalography (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) technology as part of an immersive multi-media science-art installation. Data from 523 participants were collected in a single night. The exploratory experiment was designed as a collective computer game where players manipulated mental states of relaxation and concentration with neurofeedback targeting modulation of relative spectral power in alpha and beta frequency ranges. Besides validating robust time-of-night effects, gender differences and distinct spectral power patterns for the two mental states, our results also show differences in neurofeedback learning outcome. The unusually large sample size allowed us to detect unprecedented speed of learning changes in the power spectrum (~ 1 min). Moreover, we found that participants' baseline brain activity predicted subsequent neurofeedback beta training, indicating state-dependent learning. Besides revealing these training effects, which are relevant for BCI applications, our results validate a novel platform engaging art and science and fostering the understanding of brains under natural conditions.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-10-202015-05-172015-07-08
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0130129
PMID: 26154513
PMC: PMC4496007
Other: eCollection 2015
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (7) Sequence Number: e0130129 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850