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  When in doubt follow your nose: a wayfinding strategy

Meilinger, T., Frankenstein, J., & Bülthoff, H. (2014). When in doubt follow your nose: a wayfinding strategy. Frontiers in Psychology, 5: 1363, pp. 1-7. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01363.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-7FA5-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-93C8-7
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Meilinger, T1, 2, Author              
Frankenstein, J, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Route selection is governed by various strategies which often allow minimizing the required memory capacity. Previous research showed that navigators primarily remember information at route decision points and at route turns, rather than at intersections which required straight walking. However, when actually navigating the route or indicating directional decisions, navigators make fewer errors when they are required to walk straight. This tradeoff between location memory and route decisions accuracy was interpreted as a ldquo;when in doubt follow your noserdquo; strategy which allows navigators to only memorize turns and walk straight by default, thus considerably reducing the number of intersections to memorize. These findings were based on newly learned routes. In the present study we show that such an asymmetry in route memory also prevails for planning routes within highly familiar environments. Participants planned route sequences between locations in their city of residency by pressing arrow keys on a keyboard. They tended to ignore straight walking intersections, but they ignored turns much less so. However, for reported intersections participants were quicker at indicating straight walking than turning. Together with results described in the literature, these findings suggest that a ldquo;when in doubt follow your nose strategyrdquo; is applied also within highly familiar spaces and might originate from limited working memory capacity during planning a route.

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 Dates: 2014-11
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01363
BibTex Citekey: MeilingerFB2014
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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 5 Sequence Number: 1363 Start / End Page: 1 - 7 Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078