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  Face format at encoding affects the other-race effect in face memory

Zhao, M., Hayward, W., & Bülthoff, I. (2014). Face format at encoding affects the other-race effect in face memory. Journal of Vision, 14(9): 6, pp. 1-13. doi:10.1167/14.9.6.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-7FE7-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-2975-E
Genre: Journal Article

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Zhao, M1, 2, Author              
Hayward, WG, Author
Bülthoff, I1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Memory of own-race faces is generally better than memory of other-races faces. This other-race effect (ORE) in face memory has been attributed to differences in contact, holistic processing, and motivation to individuate faces. Since most studies demonstrate the ORE with participants learning and recognizing static, single-view faces, it remains unclear whether the ORE can be generalized to different face learning conditions. Using an old/new recognition task, we tested whether face format at encoding modulates the ORE. The results showed a significant ORE when participants learned static, single-view faces (Experiment 1). In contrast, the ORE disappeared when participants learned rigidly moving faces (Experiment 2). Moreover, learning faces displayed from four discrete views produced the same results as learning rigidly moving faces (Experiment 3). Contact with other-race faces was correlated with the magnitude of the ORE. Nonetheless, the absence of the ORE in Experiments 2 and 3 cannot be readily explained by either more frequent contact with other-race faces or stronger motivation to individuate them. These results demonstrate that the ORE is sensitive to face format at encoding, supporting the hypothesis that relative involvement of holistic and featural processing at encoding mediates the ORE observed in face memory.

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 Dates: 2014-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1167/14.9.6
BibTex Citekey: ZhaoHB2014
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Title: Journal of Vision
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 14 (9) Sequence Number: 6 Start / End Page: 1 - 13 Identifier: -