English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Emotion categorization of body expressions in narrative scenarios

Volkova, E., Mohler, B., Dodds, T., Tesch, J., & Bülthoff, H. (2014). Emotion categorization of body expressions in narrative scenarios. Frontiers in Psychology, 5: 623, pp. 1-11. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00623.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-800F-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-93CA-5
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Volkova, EP1, 2, Author              
Mohler, BJ1, 2, Author              
Dodds, TJ1, 2, Author              
Tesch, J1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group Space and Body Perception, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_2528693              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              
3Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Humans can recognize emotions expressed through body motion with high accuracy even when the stimuli are impoverished. However, most of the research on body motion has relied on exaggerated displays of emotions. In this paper we present two experiments where we investigated whether emotional body expressions could be recognized when they were recorded during natural narration. Our actors were free to use their entire body, face, and voice to express emotions, but our resulting visual stimuli used only the upper body motion trajectories in the form of animated stick figures. Observers were asked to perform an emotion recognition task on short motion sequences using a large and balanced set of emotions (amusement, joy, pride, relief, surprise, anger, disgust, fear, sadness, shame, and neutral). Even with only upper body motion available, our results show recognition accuracy significantly above chance level and high consistency rates among observers. In our first experiment, that used more classic emotion induction setup, all emotions were well recognized. In the second study that employed narrations, four basic emotion categories (joy, anger, fear, and sadness), three non-basic emotion categories (amusement, pride, and shame) and the ldquo;neutralrdquo; category were recognized above chance. Interestingly, especially in the second experiment, observers showed a bias toward anger when recognizing the motion sequences for emotions. We discovered that similarities between motion sequences across the emotions along such properties as mean motion speed, number of peaks in the motion trajectory and mean motion span can explain a large percent of the variation in observers' responses. Overall, our results show that upper body motion is informative for emotion recognition in narrative scenarios.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2014-06
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00623
BibTex Citekey: VolkovaMDTB2014_2
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 5 Sequence Number: 623 Start / End Page: 1 - 11 Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: /journals/resource/1664-1078