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  Assessing randomness and complexity in human motion trajectories through analysis of symbolic sequences

Peng, Z., Genewein, T., & Braun, D. (2014). Assessing randomness and complexity in human motion trajectories through analysis of symbolic sequences. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8: 168, pp. 1-13. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2014.00168.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-8043-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-8CD8-E
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Peng, Zhen1, 2, Author              
Genewein, T1, 2, Author              
Braun, DA1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group Sensorimotor Learning and Decision-Making, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497809              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Complexity is a hallmark of intelligent behavior consisting both of regular patterns and random variation. To quantitatively assess the complexity and randomness of human motion, we designed a motor task in which we translated subjects' motion trajectories into strings of symbol sequences. In the first part of the experiment participants were asked to perform self-paced movements to create repetitive patterns, copy pre-specified letter sequences, and generate random movements. To investigate whether the degree of randomness can be manipulated, in the second part of the experiment participants were asked to perform unpredictable movements in the context of a pursuit game, where they received feedback from an online Bayesian predictor guessing their next move. We analyzed symbol sequences representing subjects' motion trajectories with five common complexity measures: predictability, compressibility, approximate entropy, Lempel-Ziv complexity, as well as effective measure complexity. We found that subjectsrsquo; self-created patterns were the most complex, followed by drawing movements of letters and self-paced random motion. We also found that participants could change the randomness of their behavior depending on context and feedback. Our results suggest that humans can adjust both complexity and regularity in different movement types and contexts and that this can be assessed with information-theoretic measures of the symbolic sequences generated from movement trajectories.

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 Dates: 2014-03
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00168
BibTex Citekey: PengGB2014
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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 Sequence Number: 168 Start / End Page: 1 - 13 Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5161