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  Subjective visual perception: From local processing to emergent phenomena of brain activity

Panagiotaropoulos, T., Kapoor, V., & Logothetis, N. (2014). Subjective visual perception: From local processing to emergent phenomena of brain activity. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society London B, 369(1641): 20130534, pp. 1-13. doi:10.1098/rstb.2013.0534.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-8056-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-2BBF-9
Genre: Journal Article

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Panagiotaropoulos, TI1, 2, Author              
Kapoor, V1, 2, Author              
Logothetis, NK1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: The combination of electrophysiological recordings with ambiguous visual stimulation made possible the detection of neurons that represent the content of subjective visual perception and perceptual suppression in multiple cortical and subcortical brain regions. These neuronal populations, commonly referred to as the neural correlates of consciousness, are more likely to be found in the temporal and prefrontal cortices as well as the pulvinar, indicating that the content of perceptual awareness is represented with higher fidelity in higher-order association areas of the cortical and thalamic hierarchy, reflecting the outcome of competitive interactions between conflicting sensory information resolved in earlier stages. However, despite the significant insights into conscious perception gained through monitoring the activities of single neurons and small, local populations, the immense functional complexity of the brain arising from correlations in the activity of its constituent parts suggests that local, microscopic activity could only partially reveal the mechanisms involved in perceptual awareness. Rather, the dynamics of functional connectivity patterns on a mesoscopic and macroscopic level could be critical for conscious perception. Understanding these emergent spatio-temporal patterns could be informative not only for the stability of subjective perception but also for spontaneous perceptual transitions suggested to depend either on the dynamics of antagonistic ensembles or on global intrinsic activity fluctuations that may act upon explicit neural representations of sensory stimuli and induce perceptual reorganization. Here, we review the most recent results from local activity recordings and discuss the potential role of effective, correlated interactions during perceptual awareness.

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 Dates: 2014-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2013.0534
BibTex Citekey: PanagiotaropoulosKL2014
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Title: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society London B
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 369 (1641) Sequence Number: 20130534 Start / End Page: 1 - 13 Identifier: -