English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Human sensitivity to vertical self-motion

Nesti, A., Barnett-Cowan, M., MacNeilage, P., & Bülthoff, H. (2014). Human sensitivity to vertical self-motion. Experimental Brain Research, 232(1), 303-314. doi:10.1007/s00221-013-3741-8.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0027-8075-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-2C3A-E
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Nesti, A1, 2, Author              
Barnett-Cowan, M1, 2, Author              
MacNeilage, PR, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Perceiving vertical self-motion is crucial for maintaining balance as well as for controlling an aircraft. Whereas heave absolute thresholds have been exhaustively studied, little work has been done in investigating how vertical sensitivity depends on motion intensity (i.e., differential thresholds). Here we measure human sensitivity for 1-Hz sinusoidal accelerations for 10 participants in darkness. Absolute and differential thresholds are measured for upward and downward translations independently at 5 different peak amplitudes ranging from 0 to 2 m/s2. Overall vertical differential thresholds are higher than horizontal differential thresholds found in the literature. Psychometric functions are fit in linear and logarithmic space, with goodness of fit being similar in both cases. Differential thresholds are higher for upward as compared to downward motion and increase with stimulus intensity following a trend best described by two power laws. The power lawsrsquo; exponents of 0.60 and 0.42 for upward and downward motion, respectively, deviate from Weberrsquo;s Law in that thresholds increase less than expected at high stimulus intensity. We speculate that increased sensitivity at high accelerations and greater sensitivity to downward than upward self-motion may reflect adaptations to avoid falling.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2014-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00221-013-3741-8
BibTex Citekey: NestiBMB2013
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Experimental Brain Research
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 232 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 303 - 314 Identifier: -