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  Frontal–posterior theta oscillations reflect memory retrieval during sentence comprehension

Meyer, L., Grigutsch, M., Schmuck, N., Gaston, P., & Friederici, A. D. (2015). Frontal–posterior theta oscillations reflect memory retrieval during sentence comprehension. Cortex, 71, 205-218. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2015.06.027.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-142D-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7C02-0
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Meyer, Lars1, Author              
Grigutsch, Maren1, Author              
Schmuck, Noura2, Author
Gaston, Phoebe3, Author
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Department of English and Linguistics, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Neuroscience of Language Lab, New York University, NY, USA, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Sentence comprehension; Time–frequency analysis; Source localization; Theta oscillations; Verbal working memory
 Abstract: Successful working-memory retrieval requires that items be retained as distinct units. At the neural level, it has been shown that theta-band oscillatory power increases with the number of to-be-distinguished items during working-memory retrieval. Here we hypothesized that during sentence comprehension, verbal-working-memory retrieval demands lead to increased theta power over frontal cortex, supposedly supporting the distinction amongst stored items during verbal-working-memory retrieval. Also, synchronicity may increase between the frontal cortex and the posterior cortex, with the latter supposedly supporting item retention. We operationalized retrieval by using pronouns, which refer to and trigger the retrieval of antecedent nouns from a preceding sentence part. Retrieval demand was systematically varied by changing the pronoun antecedent: Either, it was non-embedded in the preceding main clause, and thus easy-to-retrieve across a single clause boundary, or embedded in the preceding subordinate clause, and thus hard-to-retrieve across a double clause boundary. We combined electroencephalography, scalp-level time–frequency analysis, source localization, and source-level coherence analysis, observing a frontal-midline and broad left-hemispheric theta-power increase for embedded-antecedent compared to non-embedded-antecedent retrieval. Sources were localized to left-frontal, left-parietal, and bilateral-inferior-temporal cortices. Coherence analyses suggested synchronicity between left-frontal and left-parietal and between left-frontal and right-inferior-temporal cortices. Activity of an array of left-frontal, left-parietal, and bilateral-inferior-temporal cortices may thus assist retrieval during sentence comprehension, potentially indexing the orchestration of item distinction, verbal working memory, and long-term memory. Our results extend prior findings by mapping prior knowledge on the functional role of theta oscillations onto processes genuine to human sentence comprehension.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-04-272014-12-182015-06-302015-07-152015-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2015.06.027
PMID: 26233521
Other: Epub 2015
 Degree: -

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Title: Cortex
  Other : Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 71 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 205 - 218 Identifier: ISSN: 0010-9452
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925393344