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  From Structure to Function, via Dynamics

Stetter, O., Soriano, J., Geisel, T., & Battaglia, D. (2013). From Structure to Function, via Dynamics. AIP Conference Proceedings, 64: 1510. doi:10.1063/1.4776502.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-103B-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-103C-7
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Stetter, Olav1, Author              
Soriano, Jordi, Author
Geisel, Theo1, Author              
Battaglia, Demian1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Nonlinear Dynamics, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2063286              

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 Abstract: Neurons in the brain are wired into a synaptic network that spans multiple scales, from local circuits within cortical columns to fiber tracts interconnecting distant areas. However, brain function require the dynamic control of inter-circuit interactions on time-scales faster than synaptic changes. In particular, strength and direction of causal influences between neural populations (described by the so-called directed functional connectivity) must be reconfigurable even when the underlying structural connectivity is fixed. Such directed functional influences can be quantified resorting to causal analysis of time-series based on tools like Granger Causality or Transfer Entropy. The ability to quickly reorganize inter-areal interactions is a chief requirement for performance in a changing natural environment. But how can manifold functional networks stem "on demand" from an essentially fixed structure? We explore the hypothesis that the self-organization of neuronal synchronous activity underlies the control of brain functional connectivity. Based on simulated and real recordings of critical neuronal cultures in vitro, as well as on mean-field and spiking network models of interacting brain areas, we have found that "function follows dynamics", rather than structure. Different dynamic states of a same structural network, characterized by different synchronization properties, are indeed associated to different functional digraphs (functional multiplicity). We also highlight the crucial role of dynamics in establishing a structure-to-function link, by showing that whenever different structural topologies lead to similar dynamical states, than the associated functional connectivities are also very similar (structural degeneracy).

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-01-15
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: eDoc: 673701
DOI: 10.1063/1.4776502
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Title: AIP Conference Proceedings
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 64 Sequence Number: 1510 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -