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  Impact of microscopic motility on the overall swimming behavior of parasites

Uppaluri, S., Nagler, J., Stellamanns, E., Heddergot, N., Herminghaus, S., Engstler, M., et al. (2011). Impact of microscopic motility on the overall swimming behavior of parasites. PLoS Computational Biology, 7: e1002058. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002058.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-11A1-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002C-27F8-2
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Uppaluri, Sravanti1, Author              
Nagler, Jan2, Author              
Stellamanns, Eric1, Author              
Heddergot, Niko, Author
Herminghaus, Stephan3, Author              
Engstler, Markus, Author
Pfohl, Thomas1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Group Dynamics of biological matter, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2063313              
2Department of Nonlinear Dynamics, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2063286              
3Group Granular matter and irreversibility, Department of Dynamics of Complex Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2063306              

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 Abstract: Microorganisms, particularly parasites, have developed sophisticated swimming mechanisms to cope with a varied range of environments. African Trypanosomes, causative agents of fatal illness in humans and animals, use an insect vector (the Tsetse fly) to infect mammals, involving many developmental changes in which cell motility is of prime importance. Our studies reveal that differences in cell body shape are correlated with a diverse range of cell behaviors contributing to the directional motion of the cell. Straighter cells swim more directionally while cells that exhibit little net displacement appear to be more bent. Initiation of cell division, beginning with the emergence of a second flagellum at the base, correlates to directional persistence. Cell trajectory and rapid body fluctuation correlation analysis uncovers two characteristic relaxation times: a short relaxation time due to strong body distortions in the range of 20 to 80 ms and a longer time associated with the persistence in average swimming direction in the order of 15 seconds. Different motility modes, possibly resulting from varying body stiffness, could be of consequence for host invasion during distinct infective stages.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2011-06-16
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
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 Identifiers: eDoc: 591424
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002058
URI: ploscompbiol.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pcbi.1002058
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Title: PLoS Computational Biology
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: 8 Volume / Issue: 7 Sequence Number: e1002058 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -