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  The impact of perceived similarity on tacit coordination: Propensity for matching and aversion to decoupling choices.

Chierchia, G., & Coricelli, G. (2015). The impact of perceived similarity on tacit coordination: Propensity for matching and aversion to decoupling choices. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 9: 202. doi:10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00202.

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 Creators:
Chierchia, Gabriele1, 2, Author              
Coricelli, Giorgio2, 3, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
2Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, Mattarello, Italy, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Economics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Coordination; Similarity; Homophily; Economic games; Social preferences; Social cognition
 Abstract: Homophily, or “love for similar others,” has been shown to play a fundamental role in the formation of interpersonal ties and social networks. Yet no study has investigated whether perceived similarities can affect tacit coordination. We had 68 participants attempt to maximize real monetary earnings by choosing between a safe but low paying option (that could be obtained with certainty) and a potentially higher paying but “risky” one, which depended on the choice of a matched counterpart. While making their choices participants were mutually informed of whether their counterparts similarly or dissimilarly identified with three person-descriptive words as themselves. We found that similarity increased the rate of “risky” choices only when the game required counterparts to match their choices (stag hunt games). Conversely, similarity led to decreased risk rates when they were to tacitly decouple their choices (entry games). Notably, though similarity increased coordination in the matching environment, it did not did not increase it in the decoupling game. In spite of this, similarity increased (expected) payoffs across both coordination environments. This could shed light on why homophily is so successful as a social attractor. Finally, this propensity for matching and aversion to decoupling choices was not observed when participants “liked” their counterparts but were dissimilar to them. We thus conclude that the impact of similarity of coordination should not be reduced to “liking” others (i.e., social preferences) but it is also about predicting them.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-11-102015-07-132015-07-28
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00202
PMID: 26283940
PMC: PMC4516978
Other: eCollection 2015
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Title: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Behav Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 Sequence Number: 202 Start / End Page: - Identifier: Other: 1662-5153
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5153