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  In vivo brain MR imaging at subnanoliter resolution: Contrast and histology.

Watanabe, T., Frahm, J., & Michaelis, T. (2016). In vivo brain MR imaging at subnanoliter resolution: Contrast and histology. Magnetic Resonance in Medical Sciences, 15(1), 11-25. doi:10.2463/mrms.2015-0048.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-2BB2-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-2940-D
Genre: Journal Article

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Watanabe, T.1, Author              
Frahm, J.1, Author              
Michaelis, T.1, Author              
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1Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578634              

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Free keywords: Gliosis; Inflammation; Iron; Magnetization transfer; Manganese
 Abstract: This article provides an overview of in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging contrasts obtained for mammalian brain in relation to histological knowledge. Emphasis is paid to the (1) significance of high spatial resolution for the optimization of T-1, T-2, and magnetization transfer contrast, (2) use of exogenous extra- and intracellular contrast agents for validating endogenous contrast sources, and (3) histological structures and biochemical compounds underlying these contrasts and (4) their relevance to neuroradiology. Comparisons between MR imaging at subnanoliter resolution and histological data indicate that (a) myelin sheaths, (b) nerve cells, and (c) the neuropil are most responsible for observed MR imaging contrasts, while (a) diamagnetic macromolecules, (b) intracellular paramagnetic ions, and (c) extracellular free water, respectively, emerge as the dominant factors. Enhanced relaxation rates due to paramagnetic ions, such as iron and manganese, have been observed for oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, microglia, and blood cells in the brain as well as for nerve cells. Taken together, a plethora of observations suggests that the delineation of specific structures in high-resolution MR imaging of mammalian brain and the absence of corresponding contrasts in MR imaging of the human brain do not necessarily indicate differences between species but may be explained by partial volume effects. Second, paramagnetic ions are required in active cells in vivo which may reduce the magnetization transfer ratio in the brain through accelerated T-1 recovery. Third, reductions of the magnetization transfer ratio may be more sensitive to a particular pathological condition, such as astrocytosis, microglial activation, inflammation, and demyelination, than changes in relaxation. This is because the simultaneous occurrence of increased paramagnetic ions (i.e., shorter relaxation times) and increased free water (i.e., longer relaxation times) may cancel T-1 or T-2 effects, whereas both processes reduce the magnetization transfer ratio.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-09-042016-01-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.2463/mrms.2015-0048
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Title: Magnetic Resonance in Medical Sciences
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 15 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 11 - 25 Identifier: -