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  Syntax in action has priority over movement selection in piano playing: An ERP study

Bianco, R., Novembre, G., Keller, P. E., Scharf, F., Friederici, A. D., Villringer, A., et al. (2016). Syntax in action has priority over movement selection in piano playing: An ERP study. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 28(1), 41-54. doi:10.1162/jocn_a_00873.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-406D-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1EC0-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Bianco, Roberta1, 2, Author              
Novembre, Giacomo3, Author
Keller, Peter E.3, Author
Scharf , Florian1, Author
Friederici, Angela D.4, Author              
Villringer, Arno2, Author              
Sammler, Daniela1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Otto Hahn Group Neural Bases of Intonation in Speech, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1797284              
2Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
3The MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney, Australia, ou_persistent22              
4Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Action; Planning; Syntax; Music; Event-related potentials
 Abstract: Complex human behavior is hierarchically organized. Whether or not syntax plays a role in this organization is currently under debate. The present event-related potential study uses piano performance to isolate syntactic operations in action planning and to demonstrate their priority over non-syntactic levels of movement selection. Expert pianists were asked to execute chord progressions on a mute keyboard by copying the posture of a performing model hand shown in sequences of photos. We manipulated the final chord of each sequence in terms of Syntax (congruent/incongruent keys) and Manner (conventional/unconventional fingering), as well as the strength of its predictabiliy by varying the length of the Context (5-chord/2-chord progressions). The production of syntactically incongruent compared to congruent chords showed a response delay that was larger in the long compared to the short context. This behavioural effect was accompanied by a centroparietal negativity in the long but not in the short context, suggesting that a syntax-based motor plan was prepared ahead. Conversely, the execution of the unconventional manner was not delayed as a function of Context, and elicited an opposite electrophysiological pattern (a posterior positivity). The current data support the hypothesis that motor plans operate at the level of musical syntax and are incrementally translated to lower levels of movement selection.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-08-132015-11-302016-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1162/jocn_a_00873
PMID: 26351994
Other: Epub 2015
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Title: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 28 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 41 - 54 Identifier: ISSN: 0898-929X
CoNE: /journals/resource/991042752752726