English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The Kuleshov Effect: The influence of contextual framing on emotional attributions

Mobbs, D., Weiskopf, N., Lau, H. C., Featherstone, E., & Dolan, R. J. (2006). The Kuleshov Effect: The influence of contextual framing on emotional attributions. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 1(2), 95-106. doi:10.1093/scan/nsl014.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-65CC-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-4D3E-4
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Mobbs_2006.pdf (Publisher version), 680KB
Name:
Mobbs_2006.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Mobbs, Dean1, Author
Weiskopf, Nikolaus1, Author              
Lau, Hakwan C.1, Author
Featherstone, Eric1, Author
Dolan, Raymond J.1, Author
Affiliations:
1Functional Imaging Lab, Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: fMRI; Kuleshov Effect; Context; Affect; Mental-state
 Abstract: Filmmakers have long recognized the importance of editing techniques to guide the audiences' perceptions and enhance the impact of a scene. We demonstrate behaviorally that pairing identical faces with either neutral or emotionally salient contextual movies, an editing technique referred to as the ‘Kuleshov Effect’, results in both altered attributions of facial expression and mental-state. Using functional neuroimaging (fMRI), we show that faces paired with emotional movies enhance BOLD responses in the bilateral temporal pole, anterior cingulate cortices, amygdala and bilateral superior temporal sulcus relative to identical faces juxtaposed with neutral movies. An interaction was observed in the right amygdala when subtle happy and fear faces were juxtaposed with positive and negative movies, respectively. An interaction between happy faces and negative context was also observed in bilateral amygdala suggesting that the amygdala may act to prime or tag affective value to faces. A parametric modulation of BOLD signal by attribution ratings indicated a dissociation between ventrolateral and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex for negative and positive contextually evoked attributions, respectively. These prefrontal regions may act to guide appropriate choices across altering contexts. Together, these findings offer a neurobiological basis for contextual framing effects on social attributions.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2006-08-162006-09-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsl014
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
  Other : SCAN
  Abbreviation : Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 1 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 95 - 106 Identifier: ISSN: 1749-5016
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000223760