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  A double-stranded DNA rotaxane

Ackermann, D., Schmidt, T. L., Hannam, J. S., Purohit, C. S., Heckel, A., & Famulok, M. (2010). A double-stranded DNA rotaxane. Nature Nanotechnology, 5(6), 436-42. doi:10.1038/nnano.2010.65.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-6440-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0028-6441-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Ackermann, D., Author
Schmidt, T. L., Author
Hannam, J. S., Author
Purohit, C. S., Author
Heckel, A., Author
Famulok, M.1, Author
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1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: DNA/*chemistry Drug Stability Electrophoresis, Agar Gel Microscopy, Atomic Force *Models, Molecular Nanoparticles/chemistry/ultrastructure *Rotaxanes/chemical synthesis/chemistry
 Abstract: Mechanically interlocked molecules such as rotaxanes and catenanes have potential as components of molecular machinery. Rotaxanes consist of a dumb-bell-shaped molecule encircled by a macrocycle that can move unhindered along the axle, trapped by bulky stoppers. Previously, rotaxanes have been made from a variety of molecules, but not from DNA. Here, we report the design, assembly and characterization of rotaxanes in which both the dumb-bell-shaped molecule and the macrocycle are made of double-stranded DNA, and in which the axle of the dumb-bell is threaded through the macrocycle by base pairing. The assembly involves the formation of pseudorotaxanes, in which the macrocycle and the axle are locked together by hybridization. Ligation of stopper modules to the axle leads to the characteristic dumb-bell topology. When an oligonucleotide is added to release the macrocycle from the axle, the pseudorotaxanes are either converted to mechanically stable rotaxanes, or they disassemble by means of a slippage mechanism to yield a dumb-bell and a free macrocycle. Our DNA rotaxanes allow the fields of mechanically interlocked molecules and DNA nanotechnology to be combined, thus opening new possibilities for research into molecular machines and synthetic biology.

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 Dates: 2010
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: Other: 20400967
DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2010.65
ISSN: 1748-3395 (Electronic)
ISSN: 1748-3387 (Linking)
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Title: Nature Nanotechnology
  Alternative Title : Nat. Nanotechn.
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 5 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 436 - 42 Identifier: -