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  Merge in the human brain: A sub-region based functional investigation in the left pars opercularis

Zaccarella, E., & Friederici, A. D. (2015). Merge in the human brain: A sub-region based functional investigation in the left pars opercularis. Frontiers in Psychology, 6: 1818. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01818.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-05B8-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-7686-1
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Zaccarella, Emiliano1, 2, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Pars opercularis; Clusters; Syntax; Merge; fMRI
 Abstract: Language is thought to represent one of the most complex cognitive functions in humans. Here we break down complexity of language to its most basic syntactic computation which hierarchically binds single words together to form larger phrases and sentences. So far, the neural implementation of this basic operation has only been inferred indirectly from studies investigating more complex linguistic phenomena. In the present sub-region based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study we directly assessed the neuroanatomical nature of this process. Our results showed that syntactic phrases—compared to word-list sequences—corresponded to increased neural activity in the ventral-anterior portion of the left pars opercularis (Brodmann Area (BA) 44), whereas the adjacently located deep frontal operculum/anterior insula (FOP/aINS), a phylogenetically older and less specialized region, was found to be equally active for both conditions. Crucially, the functional activity of syntactic binding was confined to one out of five clusters proposed by a recent fine-grained sub-anatomical parcellation for BA 44, with consistency across individuals. Neuroanatomically, the present results call for a redefinition of BA 44 as a region with internal functional specializations. Neurocomputationally, they support the idea of invariance within BA 44 in the location of activation across participants for basic syntactic building processing.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-09-152015-11-102015-11-27
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01818
PMID: 26640453
PMC: PMC4661288
Other: eCollection 2015
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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 Sequence Number: 1818 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: /journals/resource/1664-1078