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  Thinking about thinking: Neural mechanisms and effects on memory

Bonhage, C., Weber, F., Exner, C., & Kanske, P. (2016). Thinking about thinking: Neural mechanisms and effects on memory. NeuroImage, 127, 203-214. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.11.067.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-1E36-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1BF3-D
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Bonhage, Corinna1, 2, Author              
Weber, Friederike3, Author
Exner, Cornelia3, Author
Kanske, Philipp4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Neurolinguistics, Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
3Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              

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Free keywords: Attention; Cognitive self-consciousness; Default mode network; Proactive interference/ memory; Salience network; fMRI
 Abstract: It is a well-established finding that memory encoding is impaired if an external secondary task (e.g. tone discrimination) is performed simultaneously. Yet, while studying we are also often engaged in internal secondary tasks such as planning, ruminating, or daydreaming. It remains unclear whether such a secondary internal task has similar effects on memory and what the neural mechanisms underlying such an influence are. We therefore measured participants' blood oxygenation level dependent responses while they learned word-pairs and simultaneously performed different types of secondary tasks (i.e., internal, external, and control). Memory performance decreased in both internal and external secondary tasks compared to the easy control condition. However, while the external task reduced activity in memory-encoding related regions (hippocampus), the internal task increased neural activity in brain regions associated with self-reflection (anterior medial prefrontal cortex), as well as in regions associated with performance monitoring and the perception of salience (anterior insula, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex). Resting-state functional connectivity analyses confirmed that anterior medial prefrontal cortex and anterior insula/dorsal anterior cingulate cortex are part of the default mode network and salience network, respectively. In sum, a secondary internal task impairs memory performance just as a secondary external task, but operates through different neural mechanisms.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-09-072015-11-282015-12-072016-02-15
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.11.067
PMID: 26673113
Other: Epub 2015
 Degree: -

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 127 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 203 - 214 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: /journals/resource/954922650166