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  Incidental rewarding cues influence economic decisions in people with obesity

Simmank, J., Murawski, C., Bode, S., & Horstmann, A. (2015). Incidental rewarding cues influence economic decisions in people with obesity. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 9: 278. doi:10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00278.

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 Creators:
Simmank, Jakob1, 2, Author              
Murawski, Carsten3, Author
Bode, Stefan4, Author
Horstmann, Annette1, 2, 5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634549              
3Department of Finance, Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Melbourne, Australia, ou_persistent22              
4Decision Neuroscience Laboratory, Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia, ou_persistent22              
5Collaborative Research Center Obesity Mechanisms, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Inter-temporal decision-making; Obesity; Priming; Delay discounting; Gender; Eating behavior; Decision-making
 Abstract: Recent research suggests that obesity is linked to prominent alterations in learning and decision-making. This general difference may also underlie the preference for immediately consumable, highly palatable but unhealthy and high-calorie foods. Such poor food-related inter-temporal decision-making can explain weight gain; however, it is not yet clear whether this deficit can be generalized to other domains of inter-temporal decision-making, for example financial decisions. Further, little is known about the stability of decision-making behavior in obesity, especially in the presence of rewarding cues. To answer these questions, obese and lean participants (n = 52) completed two sessions of a novel priming paradigm including a computerized monetary delay discounting task. In the first session, general differences between groups in financial delay discounting were measured. In the second session, we tested the general stability of discount rates. Additionally, participants were primed by affective visual cues of different contextual categories before making financial decisions. We found that the obese group showed stronger discounting of future monetary rewards than the lean group, but groups did not differ in their general stability between sessions nor in their sensitivity toward changes in reward magnitude. In the obese group, a fast decrease of subjective value over time was directly related to a higher tendency for opportunistic eating. Obese in contrast to lean people were primed by the affective cues, showing a sex-specific pattern of priming direction. Our findings demonstrate that environments rich of cues, aiming at inducing unhealthy consumer decisions, can be highly detrimental for obese people. It also underscores that obesity is not merely a medical condition but has a strong cognitive component, meaning that current dietary and medical treatment strategies may fall too short.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-07-132015-09-282015-10-15
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00278
PMID: 26528158
PMC: PMC4606016
Other: eCollection 2015
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Title: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Behav Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 Sequence Number: 278 Start / End Page: - Identifier: Other: 1662-5153
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5153