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  Ontogenic growth as the root of fundamental differences between childhood and adult cancer

Werner, B., Traulsen, A., & Dingli, D. (2016). Ontogenic growth as the root of fundamental differences between childhood and adult cancer. Stem Cells, 34: 2251, pp. 543-550. doi:10.1002/stem.2251.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-47B5-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-2070-5
Genre: Journal Article

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Werner_et_al_2015.pdf (Publisher version), 523KB
 
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 Creators:
Werner, Benjamin1, Author              
Traulsen, Arne1, Author              
Dingli, David, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445641              

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Free keywords: Acute lymphocytic leukemia;Acute myelogenous leukemia;Adult haematopoietic stem cells;Cancer stem cells;Hemopoietic stem cells;Self-renewal
 Abstract: Cancer, the unregulated proliferation of cells, can occur at any age and may arise from almost all cell types. However, the incidence and types of cancer differ with age. Some cancers are predominantly observed in children, others are mostly restricted to older ages. Treatment strategies of some cancers are very successful and cure is common in childhood, while treatment of the same cancer type is much more challenging in adults. Here, we develop a stochastic model of stem cell proliferation that considers both tissue development and homeostasis and discuss the disturbance of such a system by mutations. Due to changes in population size, mutant fitness becomes context dependent and consequently the effects of mutations on the stem cell population can vary with age. We discuss different mutant phenotypes and show the age dependency of their expected abundances. Most importantly, fitness of particular mutations can change with age and advantageous mutations can become deleterious or vice versa. This perspective can explain unique properties of childhood disorders, for example, the frequently observed phenomenon of a self-limiting leukemia in newborns with trisomy 21, but also explains other puzzling observations such as the increased risk of leukemia in patients with bone marrow failure or chemotherapy induced myelodysplasia.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-09-282015-06-202015-10-012015-12-222016-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/stem.2251
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Title: Stem Cells
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Dayton, Ohio : AlphaMed Press
Pages: 8 S. Volume / Issue: 34 Sequence Number: 2251 Start / End Page: 543 - 550 Identifier: ISSN: 1066-5099
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925601690