English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The neural bases of spatial frequency processing during scene perception

Kauffmann, L., Ramanoël, S., & Peyrin, C. (2014). The neural bases of spatial frequency processing during scene perception. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, 8: 37. doi:10.3389/fnint.2014.00037.

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Kauffmann_2014.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
Name:
Kauffmann_2014.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Kauffmann, Louise1, 2, Author              
Ramanoël, Stephen1, 2, Author
Peyrin, Carole1, 2, Author
Affiliations:
1Université Grenoble Alpes, France, ou_persistent22              
2Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Université Grenoble Alpes, France, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Natural scene; Spatial frequencies; Coarse-to-fine; Hemispheric specialization; Retinotopy; Parahippocampal place area
 Abstract: Theories on visual perception agree that scenes are processed in terms of spatial frequencies. Low spatial frequencies (LSF) carry coarse information whereas high spatial frequencies (HSF) carry fine details of the scene. However, how and where spatial frequencies are processed within the brain remain unresolved questions. The present review addresses these issues and aims to identify the cerebral regions differentially involved in low and high spatial frequency processing, and to clarify their attributes during scene perception. Results from a number of behavioral and neuroimaging studies suggest that spatial frequency processing is lateralized in both hemispheres, with the right and left hemispheres predominantly involved in the categorization of LSF and HSF scenes, respectively. There is also evidence that spatial frequency processing is retinotopically mapped in the visual cortex. HSF scenes (as opposed to LSF) activate occipital areas in relation to foveal representations, while categorization of LSF scenes (as opposed to HSF) activates occipital areas in relation to more peripheral representations. Concomitantly, a number of studies have demonstrated that LSF information may reach high-order areas rapidly, allowing an initial coarse parsing of the visual scene, which could then be sent back through feedback into the occipito-temporal cortex to guide finer HSF-based analysis. Finally, the review addresses spatial frequency processing within scene-selective regions areas of the occipito-temporal cortex.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-02-162014-04-192014-05-07
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnint.2014.00037
PMID: 24847226
PMC: PMC4019851
Other: eCollection 2014
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Lausanne : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 Sequence Number: 37 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5145
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-5145