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  Higher body mass index in older adults is associated with lower gray matter volume: Implications for memory performance

Kharabian, S., Arélin, K., Horstmann, A., Lampe, L., Kipping, J., Luck, T., et al. (2016). Higher body mass index in older adults is associated with lower gray matter volume: Implications for memory performance. Neurobiology of Aging, 40, 1-10. doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.12.020.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-4DA4-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1A5C-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kharabian, Shahrzad1, Author              
Arélin, Katrin1, 2, 3, Author              
Horstmann, Annette1, 4, Author              
Lampe, Leonie1, 2, Author              
Kipping, Judy1, Author              
Luck, Tobias2, 5, Author
Riedel-Heller, Steffi5, Author
Schroeter, Matthias L.1, 3, 4, Author              
Stumvoll, Michael4, 6, Author
Villringer, Arno1, 3, 6, Author              
Witte, Veronica1, 6, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases (LIFE), University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Institute of Social Medicine, Occupational Health and Public Health (ISAP), University Hospital Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Collaborative Research Center Obesity Mechanisms, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Cognitive ageing; VBM; Cognitive performance; Healthy aging; Lifestyle factors; Overweight; Adiposity; Cohort studies
 Abstract: Midlife obesity has been associated with increased dementia risk, yet reports on brain structure and function are mixed. We therefore assessed the effects of body mass index (BMI) on gray matter volume (GMV) and cognition in a well-characterized sample of community-dwelled older adults. GMV was measured using 3T-neuroimaging in 617 participants (258 women, 60-80 years, BMI 17-41 kg/m2). Also, cognitive performance and various confounders including hypertension, diabetes and APOE-genotype were assessed. A higher BMI correlated significantly with lower GMV in multiple brain regions, including (pre)frontal, temporal, insular and occipital cortex, thalamus, putamen, amygdala and cerebellum, even after adjusting for confounders. Also, lower GMV in prefrontal and thalamic areas partially mediated negative effects of (1) higher BMI and (2) higher age on memory performance. We here showed that a higher BMI in older adults is associated with widespread gray matter alterations, irrespective of obesity-related co-morbidities and other confounders. Our results further indicate that a higher BMI induces structural alterations that translate into subtle impairments in memory performance in aging.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-12-282015-06-242015-12-282016-01-042016-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.12.020
PMID: 26973099
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

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Title: Neurobiology of Aging
  Other : Neurobiol. Aging
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
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Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 40 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1 - 10 Identifier: ISSN: 0197-4580
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925491902