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  Putting the face in context: Body expressions impact facial emotion processing in human infants

Rajhans, P., Jessen, S., Missana, M., & Grossmann, T. (2016). Putting the face in context: Body expressions impact facial emotion processing in human infants. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 19, 115-121. doi:10.1016/j.dcn.2016.01.004.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-781B-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1DE2-E
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Rajhans, Purva1, Author              
Jessen, Sarah1, Author              
Missana, Manuela1, Author              
Grossmann, Tobias2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Early Social Development, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356545              
2Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Emotion; Infants; Body expressions; Priming; ERP
 Abstract: Body expressions exert strong contextual effects on facial emotion perception in adults. Specifically, conflicting body cues hamper the recognition of emotion from faces, as evident on both the behavioral and neural level. We examined the developmental origins of the neural processes involved in emotion perception across body and face in 8-month-old infants by measuring event-related brain potentials (ERPs). We primed infants with body postures (fearful, happy) that were followed by either congruent or incongruent facial expressions. Our results revealed that body expressions impact facial emotion processing and that incongruent body cues impair the neural discrimination of emotional facial expressions. Priming effects were associated with attentional and recognition memory processes, as reflected in a modulation of the Nc and Pc evoked at anterior electrodes. These findings demonstrate that 8-month-old infants possess neural mechanisms that allow for the integration of emotion across body and face, providing evidence for the early developmental emergence of context-sensitive facial emotion perception.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-01-282015-06-102016-01-302016-02-172016-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.dcn.2016.01.004
PMID: 26974742
PMC: Epub 2016
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Title: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 19 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 115 - 121 Identifier: ISSN: 1878-9293
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1878-9293