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  Using executive control training to suppress amygdala reactivity to aversive information

Cohen, N., Margulies, D. S., Ashkenazi, S., Schäfer, A., Taubert, M., Henik, A., et al. (2016). Using executive control training to suppress amygdala reactivity to aversive information. NeuroImage, 125, 1022-1031. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.10.069.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-7A95-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1B61-2
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Cohen, N.1, Author
Margulies, Daniel S.2, Author              
Ashkenazi, S.3, Author
Schäfer, Alexander4, 5, Author              
Taubert, Marco4, Author              
Henik, A.1, 5, Author
Villringer, Arno4, Author              
Okon-Singer, Hadas6, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Research Group Neuroanatomy and Connectivity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356546              
3School of Education, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, ou_persistent22              
4Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
5Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Clinical Imaging Research Centre & Singapore Institute for Neurotechnology, National University of Singapore, ou_persistent22              
6Department of Psychology, University of Haifa, Israel, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Amygdala; Executive control; Training; Emotional interference; Inferior frontal gyrus; fMRI; Connectivity
 Abstract: The ability to regulate emotions is essential for adaptive behavior. This ability is suggested to be mediated by the connectivity between prefrontal brain regions and the amygdala. Yet, it is still unknown whether the ability to regulate emotions can be trained by using a non-emotional procedure, such as the recruitment of executive control (EC). Participants who were trained using a high-frequent executive control (EC) task (80% incongruent trials) showed reduced amygdala reactivity and behavioral interference of aversive pictures. These effects were observed only following multiple-session training and not following one training session. In addition, they were not observed for participants exposed to low-frequent EC training (20% incongruent trials). Resting-state functional connectivity analysis revealed a marginally significant interaction between training group and change in the connectivity between the amygdala and the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Amygdala–IFG connectivity was significantly increased following the training only in the high-frequent EC training group. These findings are the first to show that non-emotional training can induce changes in amygdala reactivity to aversive information and alter amygdala–prefrontal connectivity.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-04-142015-10-242015-10-282016-01-15
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.10.069
PMID: 26520770
Other: Epub 2015
 Degree: -

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 125 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1022 - 1031 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: /journals/resource/954922650166