English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Pupillary responses reveal infants’ discrimination of facial emotions independent of conscious perception

Jessen, S., Altvater-Mackensen, N., & Grossmann, T. (2016). Pupillary responses reveal infants’ discrimination of facial emotions independent of conscious perception. Cognition, 150, 163-169. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2016.02.010.

Item is

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Jessen, Sarah1, Author           
Altvater-Mackensen, Nicole1, Author           
Grossmann, Tobias2, Author           
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Early Social Development, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356545              
2Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Infants; Subliminal processing; Pupillometry; Emotions; Eyetracking
 Abstract: Sensitive responding to others’ emotions is essential during social interactions among humans. There is evidence for the existence of subcortically mediated emotion discrimination processes that occur independent of conscious perception in adults. However, only recently work has begun to examine the development of automatic emotion processing systems during infancy. In particular, it is unclear whether emotional expressions impact infants’ autonomic nervous system regardless of conscious perception. We examined this question by measuring pupillary responses while subliminally and supraliminally presenting 7-month-old infants with happy and fearful faces. Our results show greater pupil dilation, indexing enhanced autonomic arousal, in response to happy compared to fearful faces regardless of conscious perception. Our findings suggest that, early in ontogeny, emotion discrimination occurs independent of conscious perception and is associated with differential autonomic responses. This provides evidence for the view that automatic emotion processing systems are an early-developing building block of human social functioning.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-02-032015-06-092016-02-112016-02-182016-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2016.02.010
PMID: 26896901
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Cognition
  Other : Cognition
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 150 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 163 - 169 Identifier: ISSN: 0010-0277
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925391298