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  Keeping an eye on the conductor: Neural correlates of visuo-motor synchronization and musical experience

Ono, K., Nakamura, A., & Maess, B. (2015). Keeping an eye on the conductor: Neural correlates of visuo-motor synchronization and musical experience. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9: 154. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2015.00154.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-7FF6-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-14F6-1
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Ono, Kentaro1, 2, 3, Author
Nakamura, Akinori3, Author
Maess, Burkhard2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Human Brain Research Center, Kyoto University, Japan, ou_persistent22              
2Methods and Development Group MEG and EEG - Cortical Networks and Cognitive Functions, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_2205650              
3National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Japan, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: fMRI; Sensorimotor synchronization; Tapping; Musical experience; Mental simulation
 Abstract: For orchestra musicians, synchronized playing under a conductor’s direction is necessary to achieve optimal performance. Previous studies using simple auditory/visual stimuli have reported cortico-subcortical networks underlying synchronization and that training improves the accuracy of synchronization. However, it is unclear whether people who played regularly under a conductor and non-musicians activate the same networks when synchronizing with a conductor’s gestures. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment testing nonmusicians and musicians who regularly play music under a conductor. Participants were required to tap the rhythm they perceived from silent movies displaying either conductor’s gestures or a swinging metronome. Musicians performed tapping under a conductor with more precision than nonmusicians. Results from fMRI measurement showed greater activity in the anterior part of the left superior frontal gyrus (SFG) in musicians with more frequent practice under a conductor. Conversely, tapping with the metronome did not show any difference between musicians and nonmusicians, indicating that the expertize effect in tapping under the conductor does not result in a general increase in tapping performance for musicians. These results suggest that orchestra musicians have developed an advanced ability to predict conductor’s next action from the gestures.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-09-012015-03-062015-04-02
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2015.00154
PMID: 4382975
PMC: PMC4382975
Other: eCollection 2015
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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 Sequence Number: 154 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: /journals/resource/1662-5161