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  Individual differences in common factors of emotional traits and executive functions predict functional connectivity of the amygdala

Rohr, C., Dreyer, F. R., Aderka, I. M., Margulies, D. S., Frisch, S., Villringer, A., et al. (2015). Individual differences in common factors of emotional traits and executive functions predict functional connectivity of the amygdala. NeuroImage, 120, 154-163. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.06.049.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-A780-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-79AF-1
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Rohr, Christiane1, 2, Author              
Dreyer, F. R.1, 3, Author
Aderka, I. M.4, Author
Margulies, Daniel S.1, 2, 5, Author              
Frisch, S.6, Author
Villringer, Arno1, 2, Author              
Okon-Singer, Hadas1, 2, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Brain Language Laboratory, Department of Philosophy and Humanities, FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychology, University of Haifa, Israel, ou_persistent22              
5Max Planck Research Group Neuroanatomy and Connectivity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_1356546              
6Department of Neurology, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Amygdala; Executive functions; Emotional traits; Prefrontal cortex; Principal component analysis; Resting-state fMRI
 Abstract: Evidence suggests that individual differences in emotion control are associated with frontoparietal-limbic networks and linked to emotional traits and executive functions. In a first attempt to directly target the link between emotional traits and executive functions using resting-state fMRI analysis, 43 healthy adults completed a test battery including executive tasks and emotional trait self-assessments that were subjected to a principal component analysis. Of the three factors detected, two explained 40.4% of the variance and were further investigated. Both factors suggest a relation between emotional traits and executive functions. Specifically, the first factor consisted of measures related to inhibitory control and negative affect, and the second factor was related to reward and positive affect. To investigate whether this interplay between emotional traits and executive functions is reflected in neural connectivity, we used resting-state fMRI to explore the functional connectivity of the amygdala as a starting point, and progressed to other seed-based analyses based on the initial findings. We found that the first factor predicted the strength of connectivity between brain regions known to be involved in the cognitive control of emotion, including the amygdala and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas the second factor predicted the strength of connectivity between brain regions known to be involved in reward and attention, including the amygdala, the caudate and the thalamus. These findings suggest that individual differences in the ability to inhibit negative affect are mediated by prefrontal–limbic pathways, while the ability to be positive and use rewarding information is mediated by a network that includes the amygdala and thalamostriatal regions.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-10-082015-06-162015-06-212015-10-15
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.06.049
PMID: 26108101
Other: Epub 2015
 Degree: -

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 120 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 154 - 163 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: /journals/resource/954922650166