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  Do people "pop out"?

Mayer, K. M., Vuong, Q. C., & Thornton, I. M. (2015). Do people "pop out"? PLoS One, 10(10): e0139618. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0139618.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-A7EF-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-77D4-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Mayer, Katja M.1, 2, Author              
Vuong, Quoc C.1, Author
Thornton, Ian M.3, Author
Affiliations:
1Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
3Department of Cognitive Science, Faculty of Media and Knowledge Sciences, University of Malta, Msida, Malta, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: The human body is a highly familiar and socially very important object. Does this mean that the human body has a special status with respect to visual attention? In the current paper we tested whether people in natural scenes attract attention and “pop out” or, alternatively, are at least searched for more efficiently than targets of another category (machines). Observers in our study searched a visual array for dynamic or static scenes containing humans amidst scenes containing machines and vice versa. The arrays consisted of 2, 4, 6 or 8 scenes arranged in a circular array, with targets being present or absent. Search times increased with set size for dynamic and static human and machine targets, arguing against pop out. However, search for human targets was more efficient than for machine targets as indicated by shallower search slopes for human targets. Eye tracking further revealed that observers made more first fixations to human than to machine targets and that their on-target fixation durations were shorter for human compared to machine targets. In summary, our results suggest that searching for people in natural scenes is more efficient than searching for other categories even though people do not pop out.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-05-172015-09-142015-10-06
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0139618
PMID: 26441221
PMC: PMC4595219
Other: eCollection 2015
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (10) Sequence Number: e0139618 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850