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  The use of intonation for turn anticipation in observed conversations without visual signals as source of information

Keitel, A., & Daum, M. M. (2015). The use of intonation for turn anticipation in observed conversations without visual signals as source of information. Frontiers in Psychology, 6: 108. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00108.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0029-AA86-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-78A5-C
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Keitel, Anne1, 2, Author              
Daum, Moritz M.3, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
2Research Group Infant Cognition and Action, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634562              
3Department Psychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634564              
4Department of Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Turn-taking; Conversations; Intonation; Visual cues; Interaction; Infants; Adults; Eye tracking
 Abstract: The anticipation of a speaker’s next turn is a key element of successful conversation. This can be achieved using a multitude of cues. In natural conversation, the most important cue for adults to anticipate the end of a turn (and therefore the beginning of the next turn) is the semantic and syntactic content. In addition, prosodic cues, such as intonation, or visual signals that occur before a speaker starts speaking (e.g., opening the mouth) help to identify the beginning and the end of a speaker’s turn. Early in life, prosodic cues seem to be more important than in adulthood. For example, it was previously shown that 3-year-old children anticipated more turns in observed conversations when intonation was available compared with when not, and this beneficial effect was present neither in younger children nor in adults (Keitel et al., 2013). In the present study, we investigated this effect in greater detail. Videos of conversations between puppets with either normal or flattened intonation were presented to children (1-year-olds and 3-year-olds) and adults. The use of puppets allowed the control of visual signals: the verbal signals (speech) started exactly at the same time as the visual signals (mouth opening). With respect to the children, our findings replicate the results of the previous study: 3-year-olds anticipated more turns with normal intonation than with flattened intonation, whereas 1-year-olds did not show this effect. In contrast to our previous findings, the adults showed the same intonation effect as the 3-year-olds. This suggests that adults’ cue use varies depending on the characteristics of a conversation. Our results further support the notion that the cues used to anticipate conversational turns differ in development.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-09-172015-01-212015-02-10
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00108
PMID: 25713548
PMC: PMC4322605
Other: eCollection 2015
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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 Sequence Number: 108 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078